Effect of sleep restriction on hunger and food intake

Effect of sleep restriction on hunger and food intake
Effect of sleep restriction on hunger and food intake

It is now generally well accepted that sleep restriction leads to increased food intake. Spiegel, Tasali, Penev, and Van Cauter (2004) were among the first to ask participants about their feelings of hunger and appetite after a 2-day period of sleep restriction (4 h time in bed (TIB)) relative to extended sleep (10 h TIB). Participants provided hourly ratings, on a visual analog scale ranging from 0 to 10 cm, to questions such as “How hungry do you feel right now?” and “How much would you enjoy eating sweets, salty foods, starchy foods, fruits and fruit juices, vegetables, meat/poultry/fish/ eggs, and dairy products?” The mean of all ratings for hunger was 24% higher after the two nights of sleep restriction relative to sleep extension, and the mean appetite rating for all categories of foods combined was 23% higher.

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